To Live A Cursed Life

Our Q Ayl’gard – Part 2

 

Hello again folks and welcome back to our Q & A series where I answer some of your questions that you have kindly offered to me as enquiring minds speculate about the dark fantasy world of Ayl’gard. In part 1 we looked at some of the many races that inhabit the many regions of this world as I was asked to choose a favourite. This time we have the opportunity to take a look at a prominent subject deeply rooted in the history of Ayl’gard – magick.

 

‘What do you think is the worst magical curse to get?’

 

The word curse is an odd one as its meaning varies depending on the perspective of the witness. For example, a lonely vagabond stumbles into a tavern one night looking to spend his last few pennies on a mug of crude, brown gammy-gut grog. It’s a particularly nasty drink but it does the job. It’s not one of those fancy taverns on the road to Covenraen where the wine flows like water, oh no! You should probably only stop into one of those if you happen to be wealthy enough to basically eat silver and shit coins. I’ll bet you’re loving that mental image now aren’t you? I’m referring to one of the lesser alehouses, the one’s held up by mould, rotten wood and has the faint whiff of piss seeped into its grimy corners. Drinking away, alone in his squalid corner, he curses the very embers coming from the fireplace behind him for his loathsome situation.

This particular vagabond just so happened to once be a prosperous trader working on behalf of the Merchants Guild until he squandered what little wealth he had investing in worthless trinkets he thought he could sell on the road for a fair bit of silver. These trinkets were said to be bristling with ‘lost’ magicks, long forgotten from the age of the Ayl’far, who forged them to bring good health and prosperity to whomever wore them. The seller, a mediocre and mild mannered mage with the ‘gift of the gab’, claimed to have unearthed an old stash and was happy to part with them. For a decent price. Well there was some magick in them, just like the mage said. Only it was a mild form of earth magick woven into the copper, keeping them held together just long enough for the mage to be well on his way before they began to fall apart. It didn’t take long for the once proud merchant’s ties to the Guild to be severed and for what remained of his possessions to be sold off just to keep a roof over his head.

If you want to talk about a more physical representation of cursed magick then I would refer you to the ailment known throughout Lochland and Ayrlaston as shatterbite. Deep in the darkest parts of the Winter Wood, there are packs of wolves with fur as white as powdered snow that have fangs capable of piercing flesh greater than most daggers. A winter wolf sighting is rare and to be bitten even more so but every now and then a hunter or proud fool will test the natural order of the wild and try to make a name for themselves by attempting to return home with the pelt of a great beast draped over their shoulder.

There is said to be old magick in the fangs of a winter wolf that dates back to a time before any written account of history, back to when the gods walked the world of Ayl’gard as men and women of flesh and blood. Any person who engages one of these wolves and is fortunate enough to walk away have a tendency to share the same fate. A single bite into their flesh, usually an arm or a leg as they try in vain to to defend themselves, and the bitter grip of winter causes the wound to literally freeze, over the course of an hour or so, into solid ice and then shatter into brittle shards with the slightest touch.

This affliction was particularly distressing for one unlucky sod, an oaf whose words were grander than his actions, who was bitten in the crotch as he attempted to kill his quarry with a dull fork. He had proffered a wager that he could achieve this feat in exchange for a night with his cousins pretty wife. Once she had learned of this wager and saw what became of the oaf, it was she who shattered his wound with one swift knee to the groin. From that point onward he became known as ‘Cold-sack Jak’ as that was all that was left of him.

When it comes to magick as a force with deep roots in this world, its influence can be far reaching and devastating. I would have to say then that ultimately it is magick itself that I would consider to be the worst curse one can get in Ayl’gard. Magick in this world has the potential to be a very potent catalyst that can elicit change, for better or for worse depending on your perspective. When it is harnessed in a manner with of some degree of control, then naturally comes the threat of others wishing to wield such a force for their own benefit. The history of Ayl’gard speaks of Kings using mages to fight wars and conquer countries, of rogue magick wielders decimating entire towns for reasons such as love, hatred or a vengeance that allowed their magicks to consume them entirely as a result of the manipulative machinations of others. Countless mages have had to endure the agony of being hunted and murdered simply for having a power that others do not fully comprehend. To be seen as a tool, a weapon to be used and feared, it is a cruel fate for those who ultimately have no choice for being what they are.

If you are lucky enough to be born into a highborn House of noble birth and your awakening to magick occurs in such a way as to not intentionally cause harm to others, then you may find yourself housed in the Aeon Citadel or the Academy in Aetheria to harness your magicks in a relatively safe environment away from the rest of the world. This is the best case scenario. Even then they are at the mercy and behest of their rulers. Many thousands, usually of lowborn birth, have not been so fortunate. A life lived in fear, doubt and wondering if you can protect yourself and those you love or even wonder if losing control will result in the death of another just because an element of magick happens to be coursing through your veins, it is simply too much for some to bear.

Rarely does one who is mageborn live a life unburdened by the effects of their power within the realms of Ayl’gard. Whether through trying to control what they have or maybe by simply giving in, they will almost always harm themselves or another in some way, intentionally or otherwise. Fail to learn how to wield your magicks, they will consume you and you will die. Lose control of your magicks and others will die. Learn to harness your magicks and become a master of your gift and the chances are that someone else will decide to use your power as they see fit.

This question was asked by The Orangutan Librarian so I would like to offer my gratitude to him for joining in as we conclude part 2. Remember folks, if you wish to participate yourselves you are more than welcome to do so by adding your own inquiries in the comments below.

A Canvas of Many Colours

Our Q & Ayl’gard – Part 1

 

Last time I welcomed you all to offer your questions to me regarding my works of fiction as a way of marking a recent milestone in the history of the Forge. I asked you good folks if there was anything you wished to know about the dark fantasy world of Ayl’gard and some of you have responded with your most appreciated inquiries. I shall now endeavour to answer some of those questions that were most suited to this subject matter.

However, after going over my previous Q & A post for a quick summary of how it transpired, I thought that this time I would do things a little differently. That last one turned out to be quite a lengthy read at well over two thousand words and upon the realisation that this one had the potential to far surpass even that in sheer content, I decided to alter how I would respond. This time around I thought I’d give each question its own individual spotlight and here is the first one.

 

‘Which of the races you’ve created is your favourite?’

 

There are a fair few races that dwell amongst the lands of Ayl’gard. The O’kr, or Ogres, of the Highlands, the Mithylfar of Sollistar, the heartland race of men in Ayrlaston and the Arj’Beral of Suthershore to name just a few examples. But to pick a favourite? Argh! I don’t believe that I can. It’s a bit of a cop out I know but stay with me because you may as well ask me to choose which race I will favour or torment based upon my own personal preferences. I’m not a sadistic bastard who specifically created a particular group just to have them suffer at the mercy of my whims, I think. We’ll see (insert ruthless laughter where appropriate), shall we!

Each race comes with their own unique characteristics that can help to give some definition to an outsider looking in. Were you to cross the Severed Sea and travel deep into the forests of Ardenea, you would eventually happen across the Yslfar (pronounced ee-sil-far), a race of pale green and brown skinned forest dwellers that value their isolation. Some of them who are able survive to live for over a hundred years have been known to have grass where their hair once grew, twigs and branches where there were once beards and their eyes begin to glow a distinctive green hue. Some of the wilder clans also consider clothing to be something of an optional ‘hindrance’ which can be a little disconcerting to an uptight foreigner.

In the marshes of Middemire their exists a peculiar race of diminutive creatures known as the Alamaxia. If I had to give them a simple explanation for the purpose of clarity, I would describe them as a race of bi-pedal, half salamander, half axolotl folks that grow to be no taller than four feet in stature. They can breathe underwater which suits their often many expeditions to the depths of the deep waters, have two sets of eyelids to be able to see clearly when submerged, are capable merchants who revel in commerce as well as having a potent desire for silver, gold and trinkets valuable and old. Some of the chubbier Alamaxians, which isn’t surprising considering they also like to eat their fair share, have a propensity to waddle around when they move which doesn’t help their reputation as fat, little con merchants to the many who didn’t quite manage to best them in the art of trade.

Far to the east, across the nigh impassable Sea of Fire, dwells the Drohken in the coastlands of Kyr’Qandor. When the beasts of the sky lost their wings ages ago, some perished and some prospered. The Drohken were one such race who settled far and away from those who hunted them into near extinction several thousand years ago. It is thought that they almost conquered the world long ago though there is very little evidence to support this vague theory still held by a few scholars today. By their own recollection though, should be you be fortunate, or unfortunate enough to actually meet one, they were once feral and ravenous beings who sought the destruction of all whereas now they live in peace as they meditate within their sanctuaries. Think of a dragon without wings, walking upright on its hind legs, dressed in simple cloth and leather and you will have a good idea of what they look like.

The overall point is that I don’t really favour one race over the others. I created each of them for a good reason, they all interest me and all have their value in the grand tapestry of the lore of this world. I will likely write a great deal more about certain races than I will others but that doesn’t necessarily mean I shall reject what they all bring to the greater narrative. When I created Ayl’gard, I wanted to work with a diverse array of peoples and cultures so that I could add substance to my tales where appropriate. Toward the beginning I decided that I couldn’t only work with humans. The prospect of only writing about our own race, frankly I was bored by the very notion. Now that doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate what other authors write when their primary focus is that of men and women. A great work of fantasy fiction is defined by its quality, not its quantity. For me though, I wanted to work with more than just humans. I wanted the availability and capability of working with a canvas of many colours and not just the tried and tested beige of humanity. That is why this world is populated with so many different races, each one has the potential to offer new challenges and opportunities in writing for any future projects.

This question was given by Minerva’s Emporium to whom I offer my thanks as we get the ball rolling on this series. To those of you who also participated (thank you once more), I will attend to your inquiries over the coming days and if any of you reading this would like to add your own questions, then I welcome the opportunity to continue answering them in due course. By all means, feel free to participate if you are inclined to do so.

 

 

The Damned Sons of Baron Thorn

In the heart of Ayrlaston, at the centre of a vast region of rivers and marshlands known as the Middemire, lies the city of Daggeron. It is an old city of water and wood, one with a history divided by circumstances of both valour and vanity. Which era can be attributed to which though is entirely dependent on who sits as the baron of the riverborn at any given time.

Today that man is Baron Edrik Thorn, second son of the late Elwin Thorn and husband to Lady Miriam. Ambitious, cunning and resourceful are all words that have been used to describe this man and none can be considered more appropriate than the former. He has earned the mocking title of the ‘Mire King’ by his fellow lords and ladies, such is his desire to rule his lands, and some might say the entire country, without having to bend the knee to another.

The great silver hall known as the Chamber of Kings is the seat of the silverborn and the House of the Valorayne Kings of Ayrlaston. Every year, the barons of the kingdom are summoned to an assembly to discuss the matters of rule and realm. Before the long talks and feasting may commence, each baron must bow to their king before all to see as a continued show of allegiance to their master and ruler. For the barons of Stonehold, Frosthaven and Amberfall this a formality that takes mere seconds to fulfil. They understand the prosperity of their unity and will not allow hubris to sully their allegiance. Yet for the stubborn Edrik Thorn, whether through spite or pride, the simple act of kneeling before his king is a burden almost too heavy to bear as he is always the last to bow.

‘The House of Valorayne and the House of Thorn, once we were equals in the great Court of Winter, when men ruled solely in the northern realms. Now I must bend the knee to that pompous arse of a king every time I see him? He who drinks wine with our so-called allies from Wintermere and dallies over trade agreements with those gold peddling Mithylfar fools to the south. The very thought vexes me. One day my son, our roots will grow deep and we shall be free of the rule of fools.’ – Edrik speaking to a young Edgar Thorn as he comes of age.

Many men and women have served the Baron of Daggeron in the decades since his father and elder brother disappeared, a dark hour for the barony still mired in mystery and murmurings of foul deeds. To this very day their bodies, nor any evidence of their whereabouts, have ever been recovered. Upon being informed of his father’s disappearance, after weeks spent enjoying the company of his new bride in Frosthaven, is was said that Edrik walked over to the fire pit in his father’s hall and burnt the letter from the king informing him that he must take up the mantle of baron before taking his seat as lord of the Middemire. In the years since, many have also fallen, in dark ways and in death, to the whims of a man never having been content with his station in life.

Edgar Thorn, firstborn and heir to his father’s seat, was killed in a bloody battle as he led the River Bann in the war against the Dothylfar years ago. The House of Thorn and every proud citizen of Daggeron would have you believe he fell to the Bloody Horde in a glorious clash of blood and blades, dying with honour as he served his House and his king to rid the Eastreach of this terrible scourge. The more commonly known story though is that he tried and failed to kill the son of the king whilst the fight raged on. There are some who doubt such a claim, saying how can Edgar Thorn have mistaken the silver clad son of the king for an ashen, blood smeared Dothylfar. Many others, including the nearby survivors who were said to have witnessed this, speak of the battle being so bloody that there was not a soldier amongst them who was not coated in a blood red veil and that the son of the baron seized the opportunity to carry out his father’s orders that night. A tale furiously denied by the Edrik Thorn to this very day. Any who speak the words saying it was so within earshot of the Bann are sentenced to be executed.

Cedrik Thorn, secondborn and now next in line to succeed his father after his brother’s death, may never see the day he becomes the Baron of Daggeron. He was a popular, charitable man and well-liked by his subjects and the people of the city, yet he never saw eye to eye with his father. Their conversations rarely ended in anything but aggressive debate. Those who consume, intentionally or not, the sap of the ebonroot are condemned to sleep for eternity. No one knows for sure how he quite managed to ingest such a substance but the effects are unmistakable. His eyes are unblinking and ever open, unable to close but he sees nothing. His skin bears a strange hue of darkened grey as if every day that passes his life to continues to gradually drain from him. Cedrik’s days are now spent in this perpetual ‘sleep’ within his room where his frail mother Miriam watches over him, day and night, tending to his needs in the hope that he will one day awaken from this nightmare. Every now and then he whispers a single word, father, yet despite this still he remains ignorant and cold to the waking world.

Though the fate of his elder brothers remains clouded in uncertainty, there can be no doubting what happened to Edmond Thorn, third son of Edrik. Whilst feasting with his family one evening, Edmond looked around their table to see the seats of his brothers and mother empty. Gripped by sorrow and angered by the ambitious machinations of his father, Edmond lost his temper and proceeded to shout words riddled with years’ worth of pent up anguish and frustration.

‘Look around father, look at this feast and all we have and yet our table grows emptier with each passing year. My brothers lie dead, broken or are trapped in towers miles away succumbing to the madness of your wishes. How many sons are you prepared to lose before you are finally satisfied?’

Edrik said nothing at first in response to this assault on his pride and on his honour. Instead he drew his blade, a sword of sapphires and black steel passed down through the ages from father to son, that was resting by his seat and plunged it deep into his son’s chest and spoke these words before he died.

‘You are my son, my blood, mine to use as I see fit. If you have nothing for me but bitter words and treachery in your thoughts, then I have no use for you. Now or ever again.’

Only two of his sons remain amongst the living. Elrik Thorn, a talented man who bears the burden of his father’s name and the reputation of his House as he resides as a mage of the Aeon Citadel. His awakening to magick as a boy was both a horrifying and gratifying experience as Edrik saw in his fourthborn son the potential to bring great honour and prestige to the House of Thorn as one of the most naturally gifted water weavers in the kingdom. It is this potential that greatly excites the baron as he eagerly awaits the culmination of Elrik’s progress.

The other is Eron Thorn, a callous man possessing great athletic prowess and sharp wit, who is imprisoned in the Spire of Covenraen for attempting to steal from the Vault of the Valoraynes. What would possess him to even try such a bold move? This is a question many have asked, including the Silver Legion commanders responsible for keeping him locked away. Their inquiries are met only with blunt observations, remarks about their lineage and incessant requests for female companionship and all are spoken wryly with a mocking smile. The king awaits his father’s attendance in his halls to answer for the crimes of his son.

The great table of House Thorn once sat a loving mother, her five young sons and a proud father with a strong will who had yet to be fully consumed by his ambitions. Now it sits empty with each evening that passes’ as Edrik Thorn dines alone, scheming in his chambers and patiently awaiting the day the last of his sons will return home to him.